Dogs in Raincoats and Taking the Classroom to the Streets: Thursday 2nd June

When a black cat crosses your path it can be seen as either a good or a bad omen, depending on which particular ideology you buy into. However, when I left the house this morning and almost walked straight into a umbrella wielding lady walking a dog in a raincoat, I knew that it was going to be a difficult day. As if Japanese umbrella usage and canines dressed as humans weren’t enough to contend with as separate entities, seeing this walking vestige of undiluted wrongness almost caused me to have an aneurism.

You see that thing attached to your skin? It's called a coat of fur; you have it for a reason!

Now that my Japanese is (at least theoretically) at the intermediate level, it has become possible to hang out with my non-English classmates without having to resort to listing the days of the week as a conversation starter. This evening a group of us went for Shisha in Shimo Kitazawa, where my peers were treated to me asking the shop owner to change the Shisha pipe, when all I actually wanted was to have it moved slightly. Still I’m sure that they would have expected nothing less from their ‘star’ pupil.

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About truehamlet

Sam is a senior lecturer in Science Communication, who researches the different ways in which media such as poetry and film can be used to communicate science to new audiences.
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2 Responses to Dogs in Raincoats and Taking the Classroom to the Streets: Thursday 2nd June

  1. Peke Penguin says:

    That thing with the Japanese lady & here umbrella .. The Japanese love to pop their umbrella up at the slightest sing of rain. This makes it dangerous for the foreigner of average height as their umbrellas are all at our eye level.

    • truehamlet says:

      How true! At 6’3” I can safely say that I am constantly in fear of hospitalization as soon as I hear the pitter-patter of rain.

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