Economic Diffusion and Written Communication: Wednesday 14th September

Today marked the final ‘lesson’ at my Japanese language school, the rest of this week being taken up with exams, the feedback from which makes up next week’s activities. As such I considered it my civic duty to make at least one substantial language faux pas, in keeping with this year of indignity and ignominy. Thankfully I was able to deliver right on cue, and so it was that my classmates were left wondering why the recent diffusion (fukyuu) of the economy had replaced the recession (fukyou) as the most significant problem facing Japanese society today.

Return to Sender.

Before my home stay starts in Hokkaido (a week on Saturday) I am expected to have written a brief email acknowledging receipt of my host family’s letter, and informing them of my arrival details. Unfortunately we don’t seem to have an email address for my family (which doesn’t exactly bode well regarding internee access for the next month), and so I had to post a letter to them, explaining that I arrive at the airport at 07:30, and could they please pick me up. I’m hoping that my offer to doing some running with the 65 year old marathon-loving (marason) grandfather might improve their mood after reading this request, although there is very good chance that I misinterpreted their letter, and that the oak book-loving (narahon) grandfather is now waiting in trembling fear.

 

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About truehamlet

Sam is a senior lecturer in Science Communication, who researches the different ways in which media such as poetry and film can be used to communicate science to new audiences.
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