Trampling Christians and Recommended Reading: Tuesday 29th November

In today’s translation of ‘Route 99’, I came across a new, and rather interesting, word for my Japanese vocabulary: fumie. According to my dictionary this is a ‘tablet bearing Christian images, on which Edo-period authorities forced suspected Christians to trample’, a pleasing image and obviously a noun with which every Gaijin should be familiar. It is words such as fumie that convince me how insane I was to ever consider learning Japanese as an achievable task; and which run me very close to throwing all of my language books into a pile, setting them alight, and trampling all over them whilst denouncing my rights to be in this country. Depressingly there is almost certainly a noun for such behaviour.

I don't even know what this is supposed to represent, other than a frankly irresponsible waste of icing.

During today’s breaks from rehearsals I spent some time chatting with Mr. Kitazawa, discussing the absurd complexities of the plot, as well as why it is that the Japanese really need about 8 different words for ‘wife’ (he was particularly tickled with my description of ‘the old ball and chain’). At one point he wrote something down in my copy of the script, imploring me that this would be of great use for my Japanese language learning, and that I should try and buy a copy, or at least rent one from the library. In my usual manner I simply agreed with everything that was being said, and waited until I was alone to try and work out exactly what Mr. Kitazawa thought I could not go without. After looking in my dictionary I was slightly disheartened to see that I really need to get hold of an ‘Elementary school level Japanese-language dictionary’.

Advertisements

About truehamlet

Sam is a senior lecturer in Science Communication, who researches the different ways in which media such as poetry and film can be used to communicate science to new audiences.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s